Afghan Fashion Models 'Symbols of Peace'

Neelab Azamzada, who owns a modeling group named Groh-e-Modelhay-e-Milli (National Models Group) has said that her group wants to be a symbol of peace in the country.
 
She said that models in the group, by presenting the Afghan traditional dress, want to promote solidarity and harmony in the society. She said that the Afghans are tired of the war, and she called for a swift start to the intra-Afghan talks.
 
Only a few women are associated with the modeling industry in Afghanistan due to the conservative nature of the society.
 
Azamzada started her career in the field of fashion designing and modeling three years ago.
 
“There are people from all ethnicities of Afghanistan on our team and this indicates their unity and love,” said Azamzada. “Our move will have its imapcts when it comes to promoting tolerance and work towards peace.”
 
Azamzada, a female entrepreneur, said that she has heard a lot about the chaos and the brutality during the Taliban regime and is now thinking of how to deal with the situation.
 
“There is apprehension in my heart. But we have no option except to move forward and accept each other, because we are the future builders and peace builders,” added Azamzada.
 
“When I entered the field of modeling, I was faced with opposition, my family forbade me–but now I have been doing it for three years. The family and the people have accepted me,” said Lida Bromand, a model.
 
Currently there are fifteen models in her group, including three female models.
 
“We are supporting peace so that we could move forward with our work,” said Mohammad Rahimi, a model.
 
“We want to show that we are together and there is no difference between us,” said Mohammad Rahimi, a model.
 
The group members said that some traditions in the society still support the Taliban’s narrative and that modeling  is still at danger in Afghanistan.
 
They called on the Afghan government not to compromise on the civil liberties in talks with the Taliban.

This article was originally published on this site.

This article was originally published on this site